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Transplant Talk – Focusing on Living Kidney Donation in Australia 2021

By June 28, 2021July 13th, 20216 Comments


We are pleased to announce that Carol Pollock, Ms Emma Van Hardeveld, A/Prof Kate Wyburn, Dr Christine Russell, Dr Philip Clayton will be joining us live on Transplant Talk on Wednesday 21st July via zoom.

Topics that will be cover included:  

  • Acknowledge the progressive decline in living kidney transplant procedures in Australia
  • Encourage discussion with individuals’ own health professionals to further discuss queries/issues raised in the webinar

    Prospective Living Donors:
  • To explain the benefits, reality and risks associated with living kidney donation
  • To outline the stages of the living donation process –
  • Pre: education and work-up
  • During: hospital procedure and care
  • Post: after-care and follow up

    Existing Living Kidney Donors:
  • To emphasise the importance of yearly medical follow-ups
  • Update on living kidney donation outcomes

    Dialysis Patients:
  • To gain understanding of the living kidney donor journey
  • To assist dialysis patients in approaching prospective living donors

    Kidney Transplant recipients (from living donors):
  • To encourage recipients to support their living donors by encouraging them to have their regular health check-ups

Suitable for Prospective living donors, Existing living donors, Dialysis Patients, transplant recipients who have received a kidney form living donor and Health care professionals working in living kidney donation.

Join us on Wednesday 21st July @7.00pm, 6.30pm (SA and NT) and 5.00pm (WA)

Living Kidney Donation Flyer

Registration: 

– https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMrf-qvqDguHtdzRWfyYyYSPLH8dAou1bGx

Transplant Australia is committed to helping everyone be active and healthier around their transplant. But of course family members, living donors, donor families and others are all welcome.

Speakers Bio’s

Facilitator – Carol Pollock – Current Deputy Chair of the Australian Organ And Tissues Authority and Chair of Kidney Health Australia.
Emma van Hardeveld – RN Renal PGDACN- Renal Transplant Co-ordinator and ANZKX (Australia and New Zealand Paired Kidney Exchange) Program Coordinator. Emma completed her nursing qualification at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in 1993 and has since worked in the Nephrology department in a variety of different roles. This has included nursing roles on the Kidney Transplant ward, as a Transplant Coordinator from 2006 and is currently the ANZKX Program Coordinator.

A/Prof Kate Wyburn is a full time Senior Staff Specialist Nephrologist and Director of Kidney Transplantation at The Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Sydney, the current Chair of the NSW Transplant Advisory Committee and member of the National Renal Transplant Advisory Committee. She is President elect of The Transplantation Society of Australia and New Zealand. She has been a Senior Lecturer at The University of Sydney since 2007 and a Clinical Associate Professor since 2013.  She undertook her PhD at Sydney University and was an NH&MRC PhD scholar. She is a member of The Kidney Node at The Charles Perkins Centre at The University of Sydney and her current areas of research include antibody mediated rejection and donor specific antibodies, blood group incompatible transplantation, and organ donation suitability.

Chris Russell has been a Kidney Transplant Surgeon in Adelaide since 2001. The Royal Adelaide Hospital performs the kidney transplants for the whole of South Australia and the Northern Territory and has a large experience in Indigenous renal transplantation.
Dr Philip A Clayton
Senior Consultant Nephrologist, Royal Adelaide Hospital Deputy Executive Officer, Australia & New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry.
Dr Clayton is a senior consultant nephrologist and epidemiologist at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. He completed his clinical nephrology training in 2010 at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. He then worked as the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry Epidemiology Fellow, concurrently completing a Masters degree in Clinical Epidemiology followed by a PhD in kidney transplant epidemiology.
During this time he also worked as a Senior Lecturer in Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Sydney, establishing a Research Methods course for its medical students. From 2014 he undertook a year of postdoctoral research supported by a Sydney Medical School Medical Foundation Fellowship.

Join the discussion 6 Comments

  • Mark Pinner says:

    Mark.Pinner decompensated liver Desease 15 months. Some great reading. Am always looking for an answer, will i get a transplant if i need one. Understanding the processes of being legible for a liver. My life has changed so much, even in sickness i feel positive. Thankyou.

  • Kevin frahm says:

    I am 90 years old. I gave my daughter a kidney in Sydney prince Henry hospital in 1956-7. My doctors were Dr Farnsworth and Dr Jeremy and Professor Mernahan. My health is going good for my age. The first live donor transplant on the east coast Australia.

  • Sandra de Lange says:

    I look forward to joining in this zoom being a recipient of a kidney and pancreas transplant for 15 years.
    Thank you

  • John Egan says:

    Carly & John Egan Tasmania, i received my transplant January 2020 at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, my amazing wife being my donor & we were in the paired exchange program with New Zealand right as covid appeared, thanks to Emma & many others at RMH we got our lives back, helping others at the start of the journey would be an honor. Love you all RMH..

  • Margaret Hamilton says:

    I am an altruistic kidney donor of 13 years ago at R.P.A in Sydney. Now 82 years old, have swum at the last transplant games in Sydney for 3 medals. Still love bing life to the fullest even in coronavirus

  • Margaret Hamilton says:

    I am an altruistic kidney donor of 13 years, now 82 years old. Swam in transplant games in Sydney for 3 medals . Still living life to the fullest even in coronavirus.

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